Why: With so much to see in Namibia, Windhoek, the country’s capital, is just the jumping point. Best of all, the U.S. dollar is strong enough to make travel, accommodations and activities all relatively inexpensive in the country — even for some luxury experiences. Windhoek is cheap in itself and has plenty of see, between exploring the local scenes like at the Namibia Craft Centre and checking out the city's German influence like at the Christuskirche church. Five-star properties, such as the Hilton Windhoek and The Olive Exclusive All-Suite Hotel can be booked for less than $150 per night, thanks in large part to the preferable exchange rate to Namibian dollars. But some of the best sights to see are located outside the city limits. Consider day or multi-day trips to get your outdoor fix and to see the stunning scenery and dunes that makes up the majority of the country. Tours, which often include meals, camping, activities and more, can be found for reasonable prices. If you’re more interested in seeing the beautiful country on your own, consider renting a car and driving to all of the sights. Entrance fees to national parks, such as the Etosha National Park, go for as little as $6 per day. Throughout the country, don’t anticipate spending a lot on food — you can find good, local dining for less than $10 per meal.
Why you should go: Prague is quintessentially European, an architecture junkie’s dream for its lofty spires, stuccoed high ceilings, and Art Nouveau quirks. Sure, it’s touristy -- just try fighting through the selfie sticks on Charles Bridge or not wincing in disgust at Kafka bastardized on T-shirts and coffee mugs -- but this is also a city with plenty of nooks and crannies to escape from the masses, from dimly lit bars, minuscule art galleries, or in some old world cafe.
Seats are limited and may not be available on some flights that operate during peak travel times and holiday periods. Flight and hotel rates may vary by day of week. Surcharges may apply to weekends, holidays, and convention periods. Flights available on published, scheduled service only. Rates may be subject to change until purchased. All Rapid Rewards® rules and regulations apply. Discounts are valid per reservation before taxes are applied. Offer not valid on existing reservations and may not be combined with any other offer. Subject to availability. Restrictions apply. The Mark Travel Corporation is the tour operator for Southwest Vacations.
Why: Made up of 15 islands and less than 100 square miles, the Cook Islands are everything you’d hope to find in the South Pacific — lush tropical beauty, vibrant reefs and a Polynesian vibe that is both traditional and modern. Its rich Maori culture is still very much intact and hospitality exudes through the friendly locals. Think: Hawaii half a century ago, but with 21st century conveniences like WiFi. Take your pick on where to stay — you’ll find reasonably-priced luxury alongside Airbnbs, beach shacks alongside boutiques, all with a rustic, island-chic appeal. The largest island, Rarotonga or “Raro,” is made up of rugged mountains, unspoiled beaches and the national capital of Avarua, where you’ll find boutique hotels, quaint shopping, rare pearls, hole-in-the-wall restaurants, coffee shops, a distillery that makes banana vodka by coffee pot and even a Friday night party bus. The island is easily accessible by bus and being only 20 miles in circumference, you can easily conquer the entire island in a day. Note to Type A travelers: Bus timetables are on, well, island time. Aitutaki Island to the north, is home to what many refer to as the world’s most beautiful lagoon, thanks to its crystal clear turquoise waters, coral reefs and sandy islets that allow for world-class snorkeling and scuba diving. When visiting the Cook Islands, it's not to be missed.
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It’s official: Americans have the travel bug. According to the U.S. Travel Association (USTA), Americans logged 1.7 billion “person trips” for the primary purpose of leisure in 2014. The USTA defines a person trip as “one person on a trip away from home overnight in paid accommodations, or on a day or overnight trip to places 50 miles or more [one way] away from home.” That works out to 5.33 leisure-focused trips for every single man, woman, cash-strapped college student, sulky teenager, wiggly child, and brand new baby in the country.
U.S.: Alabama: Birmingham; Alaska: Anchorage; Arizona: Sedona; Tucson; California: Burbank; Long Beach; Ontario; Palm Springs; Sacramento; San Jose; Santa Barbara; Colorado: Colorado Springs; Connecticut: Hartford; Florida: Clearwater; Daytona Beach; Ft. Walton Beach; Naples; Marco Island; Key Largo; Melbourne Area; Cocoa Beach; Vero Beach; Miami; Pensacola; St. Petersburg; Tampa; Georgia: Atlanta; Savannah; Idaho: Boise; Illinois: Chicago; Indiana: Indianapolis; Kentucky: Louisville; Maine: Portland; Maryland: Baltimore; Michigan: Detroit; Flint; Grand Rapids; Traverse City; Minnesota: Minneapolis/St. Paul and Mall of Americaopens in a new window; Rochester; Mississippi: Gulfport and Biloxi; Jackson; Missouri: Kansas City; St. Louis; Montana: Billings; Bozeman; Kalispell; Missoula; Nebraska: Omaha; Nevada: Reno and Lake Tahoe; New Hampshire: Manchester; New Mexico: Albuquerque; New York: Albany; Buffalo; Rochester; White Plains; North Carolina: Charlotte; Greensboro; Raleigh; North Dakota: Fargo; Ohio: Cincinnati; Cleveland; Columbus; Dayton; Oklahoma: Oklahoma City; Tulsa; Oregon: Portland; Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh; Rhode Island: Providence; South Carolina: Charleston; Greenville; Hilton Head; Myrtle Beach; South Dakota: Rapid City and The Black Hills; Tennessee: Chattanooga; Knoxville; Memphis; Texas: Dallas/Ft. Worth; El Paso; Virginia: Newport News/Williamsburg; Norfolk; Richmond; Washington: Spokane; West Virginia: Charleston; Wisconsin: Green Bay; Madison; Milwaukee; Wyoming: Casper; Cody
Caribbean - Last-Minute Holiday Sale offer: Valid on new bookings at participating resorts made 10/29 - 11/25/18 for select travel 10/29/18 - 1/5/19. Offers vary by hotel and may be category-specific, require advance booking, be restricted to specific days of the week and/or require a minimum night stay. Booking and travel dates vary by hotel. Blackout dates may apply.
How cheap is it? Very. Its largest city -- helpfully named Panama City -- is the world's third-cheapest major city. And it is major! Panama has the fastest growing economy in Latin America, with abundant new restaurants and luxury hotels; it's pretty much the most (and arguably only) truly global/metropolitan city in the region. And still a bunk in a cheap but well-reviewed and centrally located hostel will set you back only $14 per night, while those seeking luxury accommodations can stay at the damn Waldorf Astoria for $149 per. Which is stupid cheap, all things being relative. A public bus ride in the city is just 25 cents. You can eat on the cheap for under $20/day for all three squares if you hit up cafés for breakfast, the beach fish markets for lunch, and restaurants without English menus for dinner. Beers will cost you anywhere from $1.25 to $3 a pop. All in all, you're getting huge bang for your buck -- oh also literally your buck, as US currency is interchangeable with the Panamanian balboa.
Jump on the solo travel trend this winter and visit beautiful Honolulu, Hawaii. Your well-rated hostel is located just two blocks from the famous Waikiki Beach and features free light breakfast and weekly outdoor entertainment. Reviewers especially loved the hostel's staff and the free events that made it easy to meet fellow travelers. What's Included?…
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